• How is our new access to newspapers and periodicals changing our understanding of print culture and the ‘media landscape’ of the enlightenment period?
  • How are digitized newspapers and periodicals informing and changing traditional humanities research?
  • In what ways can these new resources facilitate new histories of, for example, journalism, advertising, reading, the idea of the ‘literary’, literary reception and reviewing, material culture and consumption, politics and the politicization of society, and national identity?
  • How were enlightenment newspapers and periodicals read, in terms of both individual readers and wider communities? How is news consumption changing in our own time, as print is increasingly supplanted by alternative media forms? Are there significant likenesses between the paradigm shift within eighteenth-century media (the birth of the mass printed newspaper and periodical) and the internet revolution today? How does news consumption – historically and now – shape subjectivity and create communities?
  • What are the limitations of these research tools, and how may they, potentially, be producing newly skewed representations of enlightenment culture?
  • What methods can be used with these new research tools to produce systematic investigations? What tools can be developed in order to facilitate aggregate searches across several databases?
  • What are the best means of mediating research results concerning such mass information resources as digital newspaper archives? How can digital technologies be employed in the broadcast of humanities research results in general, and more specifically to display and interpret patterns of information dissemination in the long eighteenth century?